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Winter Driving

Winter Driving Safety & Survival

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Winter is here, and if it hasn’t arrived in your state just yet, get ready because it is on it’s way in a quick hurry. Several northern tier states are already experiencing wild winter weather and most weather forecasts are calling for more of the white stuff to continue falling over the next couple of weeks. One of the biggest threats to survival in the winter is driving, especially on icy roads and highways! Having lived in a northern tier state for 30+ years before relocating to warmer climates in the last couple of years, I can assure you that driving in the winter is akin to having teeth pulled without the benefit of a numbing agent.

You have to rely on the abilities of everybody else who is out on the roads at the same time you are; you know the sort, bald tires, bad brakes, the defrost in the car quit working, windshield wipers are in such disrepair that they actually make matters worse when they’re activated, and yet there they are, out on the roads placing everybody else in danger just so they can get to the corner store for that nonsensical item that could’ve just as easily waited until better weather arrived.

Winter Driving

Image Source: http://www.michiganautolaw.com

Fox 19:

“Lake-effect snow blanketed the northeast corner of Ohio and caused major backups on the roadways Thursday night.The massive pileup left drivers stranded on the road for hours – a survival kit could help you if you’re trapped in your car during a winter storm.

“Now is the time to prepare your car and be ready to deal with those challenges if you find yourself in that situation,” Lt. Stephen Saunders said. Have a survival kit in your car filled with items that could come in handy.

“Just make your own container. Really simple things to do like get a water, flashlight, flares, blanket, maybe some hand warmers. Just basic things that are going to keep you comfortable until help can come your way,” Saunders said.

“Keep your car fueled as much as possible because if you get stuck in traffic, car breaks down or a big pileup, you could be sitting in your car for hours at a time,” Saunders said.

The tank doesn’t always have to be full, but it helps to not let the gauge drop below a quarter of a tank. A 2015 study by The U.S. Department of Energy said an idle car engine burns on average two-tenths of a gallon of gas per hour.

“It’s a safety precaution. We want people to know that as they are out-and-about traveling for the holidays, going to visit family and friends and relatives to be mindful of preparing yourself for some of those potential challenges if you get stuck on the roads,” Saunders said.

One other important thing to remember if you get into an accident on the highway is to stay in your vehicle until help arrives.”



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